We have updated and improved this bird feeder – but take a look at the first one we made

A feeder that keeps birds and bird food dry. Shame the hanging bird feeder fell down!

A feeder that provides shelter to birds while they are feeding  and keeps bird food dry. Shame the hanging bird feeder fell down!

This is the first one of this type we made.  We have improved it and made small changes to it.

If you would like more information or are interested in purchasing a new, unused, updated bird feeder of this type then please get in touch

Trisha

birdtablenews@googlemail.com

WEATHER PROOF BIRD FEEDER FOR SALE

IMG_1798

This bird feeder will solve a lot of your bird feeding problems.

It keeps the birds sheltered from rain, snow, wind and freezing conditions.  Garden Birds can feed away from the bad weather.

The two side panels are mesh which allows smaller birds to get to the food.

This bird feeder keeps the bird food dry.  YES – A BIRD FEEDER THAT KEEPS BIRD FOOD DRY!

If you are interested and would like more information, details about price and any other information please contact me at

birdtablenews@googlemail.com

 

It is made in Yorkshire

Trisha

A Young Greenfinch Remembered?

 

 

The Power of the Internet! In 2011 Ashley wrote the comment below.  In 2015 Darren replied.

2011 from Ashley  –  Sparrowhawk attacks – I’m hunting for ways to stop these attacks also. I’ve read all your posts here and I’m feeling a bit deflated, but will not rest until I find the right solution!

I’ll try not to bore you all – Yesterday I opened my patio door for the cat to go out and straight away a greenfinch landed on the ground, fluffed it’s feathers-up and went to sleep. Needless to say I shut the door and kept the cat in.

I watched the bird a while and it was very happy. A young one. It woke up a little bit later and had a swim, a drink and some food and then left. Today it came back. It was happily drinking from the bird bath. A big bird swooped in. Immediately I thought it was a clumsy wood pigeon.

Of course it turned out to be a sparrowhawk and as far as I can tell it got the young bird. The young one was so dopey it would be very unlikely to have got away. Such a waste of a happy little soul.

Like a previous said about the number of birds they used to have – we used to have 50+ tree sparrows every day, feeding, bathing and drinking. Amongst others like the tits and finches. Now we’re lucky to 10 of any variety.

I’m wondering if I just stop encouraging the birds to come to our garden for a while and stop feeding them …

Ashley

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I replied –

Hi Ashley,   It is a problem when sparrowhawks descend on a garden.  I think there are more around than there used to be.

I don’t know what to say about stopping feeding the garden birds for a while.  It would stop them visiting your garden and so save them from the attacks. But would the sparrowhawk attack them somewhere else?

What with cats, hawks and freezing winters where food is scarce – our garden birds do well to survive

Have you thought of this Hawk Deterrant Balloon.  Here is the link –

 We’d love to know how you get on with this problem. 

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In  2015 Darren replied –

Sparrowhawk has to eat too! I regularly have a male and female sparrowhawk take birds and the numbers don’t deplete… They have now plummeted since they renovated the houses and removed bushes ect in the local area.. This removes nesting spaces etc. Could be something like that in your area.  Darren

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Darren makes an interesting point.  Maybe it is a combination of both, but sparrowhawks are a problem.

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This thread started at –

http://birdtablenews.com/2011/10/the-short-life-of-a-happy-young-greenfinch/

Because of the Internet another point of view had been aired and also a young greenfinch has been remembered.

Trisha

Sparrow hawks taking a kitten

This is a comment from one of my readers.  I am receiving a lot of comments from readers who are having problems.

Trisha,

The sparrowhawk is back with a vengeance!

I have a small 9wk old puppy & am too scared to leave it in the garden on it’s own. So I will stop feeding the birds until it goes again.

A friend’s kitten was taken from her garden, not far from here recently. Also small chickens were nearly taken, the owner’s spaniel saw it off.

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 THIS IS IN REPLY TO AN ARTICLE I WROTE ON 21 MARCH 2010.  READERS HAVE BEEN GETTING IN TOUCH WITH ME ON AND OFF SINCE THEN

THE ARTICLE IS – WAYS TO STOP SPARROWHAWK ATTACKS IN GARDENS.  HERE IS THE LINK –

HOPE YOU FIND IT INTERESTING

WAYS TO STOP SPARROWHAWK ATTACKS IN GARDENS

Advice: To reduce attacks on doves keep them in an aviary instead of a dovecote

 

If anyone reading this keeps garden doves in a dovecote and is having problems with predators, I would recommend keeping them in an aviary instead.

This is how I reduced the attacks, although sadly have not eliminated them. The aviary has 2 flight holes that enable the birds to go in and out freely.

It is also possible to close the flight holes during times of increased attacks. The protective environment also allows the squabs to leave the nest and be fed on the ground safely by their parents, without risk from cats or other predators.

Tanya

The sparrow hawk is the greatest threat to our flock of white garden doves

 

Hello Trisha,

The sparrow hawk is the greatest threat to our flock of white garden doves.

Since I first starting keeping doves in 2008 I have witnessed countless attacks on my birds by the ‘hawk and although some have survived with complete recovery or scars, the majority have been killed, and usually eaten alive.

It is devastating to witness and there have been times when I have felt irresponsible for keeping the flock going, when most of them are destined to be predated soon after fledging, or of living in constant fear of attack. Occasionally the ‘hawk seems to be hunting elsewhere and the doves begin to enjoy life again, using their bath and sitting preening on the roof of their aviary.

I know of no deterrent to the sparrow hawk, although have found the terror eyes balloons to be effective in keeping the buzzards away (another predator).

If anyone reading this keeps garden doves in a dovecote and is having problems with predators, I would recommend keeping them in an aviary instead. This is how I reduced the attacks, although sadly have not eliminated them. The aviary has 2 flight holes that enable the birds to go in and out freely. It is also possible to close the flight holes during times of increased attacks. The protective environment also allows the squabs to leave the nest and be fed on the ground safely by their parents, without risk from cats or other predators.
The prevalence of sparrow hawks, where I live anyway, (West Berkshire) is due to the purposeful breeding of pheasants for shooting and the abundance of food for birds of prey when the pheasant chicks hatch.
I have seen no sparrows in this part of Berkshire, in fact I have read that they are in general decline throughout the UK, not only due to loss of habitat but because their numbers have been drastically reduced by the hunting sparrow hawk.

Tanya

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 So much care to stop the doves being killed.

I had never thought of sparow hawk numbers being linked to the breeding of pheasants and the abundance of food – but it does make sense.

USE AN AVIARY INSTEAD.  Tanya I’m sure this advice will help a lot of people

Trisha

 TANYA GOT IN TOUCH WITH ME BECAUSE OF AN ARTICLE I WROTE ON 21 MARCH 2010.  READERS HAVE BEEN GETTING IN TOUCH WITH ME ON AND OFF SINCE THEN

THE ARTICLE IS – WAYS TO STOP SPARROWHAWK ATTACKS IN GARDENS.  HERE IS THE LINK –

HOPE YOU FIND IT INTERESTING

http://birdtablenews.com/2010/03/ways-to-stop-sparrowhawk-attacks-in-gardens/

17 YEAR SWALLOW STUDY BY GARTH LOWE

Good to hear you are still able to get out and see nature.
One bit of interesting news I thought I would tell you is about my swallow study, now in its 17th year.
At one of my swallow sites where birds had again returned to a garage, I went to ring the nestlings and also caught the parents. This is an odd site as the birds go in through the rear door tucked away at the back, and I was pretty certain one must be from last year who had remembered this good site. To my surprise both birds had my rings on and on checking my records this is now the third time both of these birds have returned to breed. This is quite incredible as it means both have been back to S Africa at least three times, survived the rigours of migration and come back to the same spot in Worcestershire.
I have had a few pairs do this twice but never three times, so the chances of it happening are quite small.
My bad news is at my best swallow site, what I guess is a corvid, has learned food can be had from nesting swallows, and just like last year it is raiding every nest giving the six plus swallow pairs that use these stables no chance at all! Last year a few managed one brood only late in the season.
Garth
I think Garth deserves a medal, don’t you?

Dunnocks feasting on soggy bread

Have a pair of Dunnock’s visiting my garden on a regular basis.

They seem quite happy feeding on soggy wholemeal bread
which I place on the bird-table.  Annette

 

Hi Annette,

The Dunnocks I get in my garden always seem to be hidden in the hedgerow.  You’re lucky that these Dunocks feel at home in your garden.

Thanks for telling us.  I can picture them happily tucking into their meal

 

A HARE IN MY GARDEN, A BIRD IN MY HEDGE AND TWO FLEDGLINGS ON MY FENCE

A Hare in my garden

A HARE IN MY GARDEN

 

A BIRD IN MY HEDGE

A BIRD IN MY HEDGE

 

FLEDGLINGS ON MY FENCE

 

Where's our mum?

Where’s our mum?

It’s nice to share my garden with wildlife. Especially the Hare, because  I usually see hares in the distance a few fields away.  It has been into the garden a few times and lays down on the grass just outside our  window.   It obviously does not know the difference between garden and countryside.  Hopefully there isn’t one.