A WAY OF KEEPING SPARROWHAWKS AWAY

The website I saw the Sparrowhawk deterrent is –

http://www.biconet.com/birds/scareEye.html 

this is in response to   

 http://birdtablenews.com/2010/12/a-way-to-keep-sparrowhawks-away/

Everytime it snows a Sparrowhawk(female) visits my garden and the birds go so wild and fly off.I have seen her on top of my Prunus tree eyeing the conifier next to it where there is a huge nest of sparrows and also lives a Robin.

From sitting on a branch she flew(all of a metre) from the prunus straight into the tree for the birds. I have even seen her chase a Blackbird around the side of my house. At first, I kept shooing her away – which worked. I saved many birds by doing this. These hawks have good memories! I was so upset!

I found a website which sells a particular type of scarecrow that will work on Sparrowhawks. It is illegal to hurt/trap these birds.

I thought a lot and after a few days, decided not to buy the device! On one hand, her presence shows I have a healthy garden. I read they only ever manage to catch just one out of every ten birds they chase.

To me, the saying “Survival of the fittest” never rang so true. I hear that the majority of time Sparrowhawks seem to catch the weak or injuried that would simply die of natual causes any way.

Only now do I have a deeper understanding of nature. Because of this thinking I don’t have that dreaded feeling of seeing her any more! Plus, Sparrows and Sparrowhawks have been living side by side for centuries without humans interfering.

The website I saw the Sparrowhawk deterrent is – http://www.biconet.com/birds/scareEye.html hope this works for you Elaine! I hear hanging anything reflective, CD’s etc. from trees also helps too.

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Thanks for sending this information.   It must have been a hard time for Sparrowhawks when the snow was on the ground.  I am not sure that Sparrowhawks go for the weakest.  I have heard of Sparrowhawks decimating an area of birds.

It is now illegal to kill Sparrowhawks. Killing sparrowhawks,  of course,  kept their numbers down.  Now, as they do not have any predators Sparrowhawks can increase in number and as their numbers increase so does the number of garden birds they prey on. I am not saying I want to kill sparrowhawks.  I’m just saying what has happened over the years

Take a look at this site  SONGBIRD SURVIVAL  

Songbird Survival discusses and studies the effects birds of prey have on Songbirds.  It is a very interesting and complicated problem.

2 thoughts on “A WAY OF KEEPING SPARROWHAWKS AWAY

  1. JON EDL

    It’s a load of rubbish “sparrowhawks go for the weaklings, they atack so silently and swiftly they will kill and eat any bird up to the size of a pigeon, in fact one of their favourite meals of recent years is the very fit, well muscled racing pigeon, and is well hated for its constant attacks on them.

  2. Trish Post author

    Hi Jon, I replied on Bird Table News and have put this –

    I have had two comments yesterday,which were similar, because they are about birds being preyed on.

    John says –

    It’s a load of rubbish “sparrowhawks go for the weaklings They attack so silently and swiftl. They will kill and eat any bird up to the size of a pigeo. In fact one of their favourite meals of recent years is the very fit, well muscled racing pigeon, and is well hated for its constant attacks on them.

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    Stan says –

    I was raised in a rural NZ region and have always lived with animals- cats especially. The little darlings certainly may catch birds, but most times they’ll bring prey back home to exchange for praise & tastier nibbles !

    The poor bird will usually be shocked (and often needs a dark warm place to recover), but perhaps half of the birds we’ve had delivered survive to fly off. But in my experiences cats far prefer mice (which they play with and eventually EAT), and they do mankind an immense favour by keeping rodents at bay.

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    Interesting

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