Devastation caused by one Sparrowhawk

Within the last few days our garden has been devastated by a Sparrowhawk.

I did manage to frighten it off one blackbird, but as each day has passed the blackbirds I have fed currants over the last four or so years have disappeared.

No dawn chorus,

red berries still on the Rowan tree – garden so still and quiet.

I haven’t seen the local Jay either. Sad but that is nature. The Sparrowhawk must move on to find more food and, hopefully, we will have new blackbirds next year

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I received the above sorry tale from a reader.

She says – it is nature, but the sparrowhawk does not have any natural predators.

I keep getting details of sparrowhawks killing songbirds. Surely sparrowhawk killings must account for some of the decline in garden birds that the RSPB is so concerned about.

If you are interested click the link below to read –

MY OPINION ON SPARROWHAWKS

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Please click the link below to read different opiniont from the RSPB and Songbird Survival on Sparrowhawks.

DIFFERENT OPINIONS FROM SONGBIRD SURVIVAL AND RSPB

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LINK TO SONG BIRD SURVIVAL

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One thing we can all do that will help and that is (if possible) plant a Hawthorn Hedge.  Sparrowhawks will not go inside a Hawthorn Hedge because of the thorny branches – they cannot risk getting their wing feathers torn

INFORMATION ABOUT HAWTHORN HEDGES

Another thing we can do is use caged feeders / covered feeders that keep large birds of prey away from garden birds when they are feeding.

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What is your opinion?

1 thought on “Devastation caused by one Sparrowhawk

  1. ROD SMITH

    Found your site whilst looking for info. on Hawthorns! Sad that so many bird lovers want to divide the natural world into “good” and “bad” and are either unable or unwilling to accept the natural dynamics of an ecosystem. As far as I’m concerned they’re all “good”. To Songbird Survival, the notion that raptors are vermin is ignorant, and belongs in the past. Your forebears deprived us of the Osprey, Goshawk and Sea Eagle,
    among others. The Sparrowhawk and its like have evolved hand-in-glove with blue tits and have helped shape their biology. I consider myself lucky to live on the outskirts of a small South Pennine town where a day’s local walking will give me Peregrine, Sparrowhawk and Kestrel. I see no shortage of Goldfinch, Chaffinch, Robin, Blackbird, Song and Mistle thrushes, Blue, Coal, Great, Willow and Long-tailed tit – the list goes on! Come on, how can you expect to provide a free picnic for all the birds that should be out foraging in the woods and get upset when a Sparrowhawk takes a meal you’ve virtually gifted it?

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